Vesicular Stomatitis

Veterinarians, their clients and those who handle horses, cattle and/or swine are asked to be on the alert for signs of Vesicular Stomatitis (VS) in recently imported animals.

VS is a viral disease that primarily affects cattle, horses, swine and, occasionally, sheep and goats. Humans can also become infected with the disease when handling affected animals, but this is a rare event.

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Often, excessive salivation is the first sign of the disease. Close examination of the mouth initially reveals blanched and raised vesicles or blister-like lesions in affected livestock. These blister-like lesions can form in the mouth and on the dental pad, tongue, lips, nostrils, hooves, and teats. The blisters swell and break, leaving raw tissue that is so painful that infected animals show signs of lameness and generally refuse to eat or drink. Severe weight loss may follow. Body temperature may rise immediately before or at the same time lesions first appear.

Any person practicing veterinary medicine in this state shall immediately notify ODA by telephone upon observing any unidentified vesicular disease, any exotic disease or foreign animal disease, even if only suspected or any disease of unknown etiology exhibiting highly pathogenic or lethal effect.

If you suspect VS, please call the State Veterinarian at (503) 986-4680.

Published: May 28, 2010;    Updated:

Filed Under: Equine, Large Animals

Source: Information provided by Don Hansen, DVM, State Veterinarian

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