Media

Contacts

The OVMA is available to assist the media in story development and breaking news coverage. We have extensive contacts within Oregon's veterinary community and can provide you with information and resources for coverage of animal health care issues.

PR Director: Raina Dey or
Executive Director: Glenn Kolb
Phone: (800) 235-3502 or (503) 399-0311
Fax: (503) 363-4218

Social Media

YouTube

About the OVMA

Our mission is to serve veterinarians in Oregon, the veterinary profession and the public through education, public relations, and political action, and by promoting among veterinarians the highest standards of animal care and professional ethics.

The OVMA is a non-profit membership association with about 1,000 members, or about 80% of the practicing veterinarians in the state. Since 1911, the OVMA has been serving the needs and interests of Oregon veterinarians and their patients by vigorously advocating for the veterinary profession and helping to ensure that practitioners from all parts of the state can continue to practice medicine in their patients' best interests.

The OVMA is governed by a Board of Directors, made up of the Executive Committee, the elected officers of the OVMA, plus eight elected regional directors.

Resources

Health alerts, seasonal topics, and coverage of ongoing stories:

Frequently requested topics:

Fast Facts: Veterinarians

  • Veterinarians are medical doctors who attend four years of veterinary school after college. A typical veterinary student spends about 4,000 hours in the classroom, laboratory, clinical study, and internships.
  • Veterinarians must pass a national examination and must acquire a license in the state they wish to practice in. In Oregon, the licensing organization is the Veterinary Medical Examining Board.
  • Veterinarians are The Other Family Doctor™. In many cases, veterinarians are your pets' obstetrician, pediatrician, dentist, dermatologist, internist, surgeon, radiologist, anesthesiologist, gerontologist, and ophthalmologist, and more.
  • There are about 95,000 veterinarians in the country; more than 61,000 are in private practice.
    Source: American Veterinary Medical Association
  • In Oregon, the median income for all private practice associate veterinarians (not owners) is $70,000 (2012 data) with a median experience level of 7 years, and the median income for new graduates (up to 3 years of experience) is $65,000 (2012 data). The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less.
  • According to a 2007 Gallup poll, veterinarians ranked third for honesty and ethics among 23 occupations. About 71 percent of survey respondents rated the honesty and ethical standards of veterinarians as high or very high. Nurses (84%) and pharmacists (73%) filled the top two spots. Physicians and dentists followed veterinarians—at 69 percent and 62 percent, respectively.
  • According to a 2008 AVMA survey, veterinarians report a high level of job satisfaction (3.55), just behind clergy (3.79), teachers (3.61) and psychologists (3.59), but above physicians (3.47) and lawyers (3.33). Veterinarians with the highest job satisfaction are food animal veterinarians (3.69).
    Source: American Veterinary Medical Association
  • Find out more about veterinarians and how to become a veterinarian.

Fast Facts

  • Oregon's pet population (approx.):
    • 968,496 dogs
    • 1,092,622 cats
    • 150,178 birds
    • 96,543 horses
      Source: OVMA calculations, using AVMA formulas (2007) and US census data (2010)
  • 2012: Americans spent more than $53 billion on food, veterinary care, kennels and other services for their pets. Source: American Pet Products Association
  • 2011: Oregon ranks 4th in nation for pet ownership, according to American Veterinary Medical Association 2011 US Pet Ownership & Demographics study. 63.6% of households in the state own a pet.
  • Pets age faster than humans. If your cat is ten years old, its equivalent age in human years is 60. If your dog is ten years old, its equivalent age in human years ranges from 56 (small breed) to 78 (giant breed).
  • Over the lifetime of their pets, the average owner will spend $10,000 on a cat, $12,000 on a small dog and $23,000 for a large dog.
    Source: American Veterinary Medical Association

Oregon Pet Highlights/Awards

  • April 2014: Livability.com names Portland the #1 Pet City in the country. Eugene is #6.
  • July 2012: Bend named "Dog Town USA" by Dog Fancy magazine.
  • July 2011: Portland was named the pet-friendliest vacation city in the United State by DogFriendly.com.
  • March 2009: Portland was ranked the 4th most cat-friendly city in the country by the CATalyst Council, a coalition of the veterinary community, academia, nonprofits, industry and animal welfare organizations. The list was compiled after reviewing the top 25 standard metropolitan areas for such data as cat ownership per capita, level of veterinary care, microchipping and cat-friendly local ordinances.
  • October 2007: Forbes magazine ranked Portland as the second most pet-friendly city in the country, partly due to having the most dedicated dog parks per capita.
  • June 2007: According to Men's Health magazine, Portland ranked number 2 in the nation for happy dogs. The magazine looked at seven criteria, including percent of ownership, dog parks, pet stores, animal shelters, boarding/day care, veterinarians and the fewest cases of heartworm. Portland ranked no. 1 in dog parks and pet stores, no. 2 in veterinarians and heartworm, no. 8 in animal shelters, no. 25 in ownership and no. 27 in boarding/day care. Overall, Colorado Springs ranked number 1 and Seattle was number 5.
  • October 2006: Dog Fancy magazine ranked Portland at No. 1 as the best all-around city for dogs in America. According to Dog Fancy, there are 136,332 dogs living in Portland, which has a human population of 554,130. With Forest Park and 33 city-maintained parks with off-leash areas, Portland is "one giant dog paradise."

Veterinary News Network (VNN)

The Veterinary News Network provides the media with pet medical story ideas, video tools, talking points, and print media story ideas and outlines, as well as referrals to local, trained veterinarian reporters or media contacts who are part of the VNN.